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Disabled Parking: Your Rights

By: Jennie Kermode - Updated: 19 Sep 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Disabled Blue Badge Disability Parking

Figuring out what you are and are not allowed to do with your car when you're disabled can be complicated. Many people don't realise that they don't actually need to own or drive a car in order to be covered under disability parking schemes. It's possible to get help even if you don't receive disability benefits, and you can even get special arrangements made to help you park close to your own home.

The Blue Badge Scheme

Most parts of Britain are covered by the Blue Badge scheme. This differs slightly in England, Scotland and Wales, but the basic principle is the same. You can apply for a blue badge from your local council - just call their general enquiries number or visit their website. Your blue badge will give you special parking privileges to make it easier for you to stop your car close to where you need to be.

If you are registered blind, are receiving the high rate of Disability Living Allowance for mobility or are receiving a War Pensioner's Mobility Supplement, you can get a blue badge automatically. If you are not in this situation but you do have a disability that makes it difficult to get around (including difficulty in carrying things or the need to keep heavy medical equipment close to you), you can apply for a badge on a discretionary basis. You can use your badge in any car.

You don't need to be the driver of a car to use your blue badge, as long as you are travelling in it. It must be clearly on display at all times when you are parked. If you ride a motorbike you can get a special secure permit holder to keep it safe.

Local Badge Schemes

Some major cities have their own badge schemes to prevent congestion. These badges make special parking provisions available to local residents only. If you have a blue badge, however, you can still park in the specially designated blue badge parking spaces in these cities.

In Northern Ireland, a blue badge will give you access to some areas but you will need a white badge for others. This single scheme applies across the whole of the country.

Where You Can Park

A blue badge will let you park in registered blue badge parking spaces. You can park anywhere that there is an on-street parking meter or a pay and display machine without having to pay, for as long as you want. You can park on single or double yellow lines as long as there are no signs prohibiting loading and unloading, but in England and Wales you are only allowed to do this for up to three hours at a time.

Some private car parks operate special rules for blue badge holders; for instance, supermarkets may have reserved parking spaces close to their entrances. Sometimes private car parks offer free parking to badge holders where they charge other users, but you will have to check the rules on entering them. Disabled drivers have no automatic right to use private car parks for free.

Blue badge access does not apply at most airports but some have their own special facilities for disabled travellers arriving by car. Your travel agent will be able to help you clarify this in each case.

Parking Near Home

If your disability means that you need to park close to your home, your local council can help. If you live in an area where everybody parks on the street, you can arrange to have a special disabled parking space created for your car or for a car driven by somebody living at your address who helps you get around.

If you have private parking at your home but can't always access it because of how other people park, you can ask the council to mark the street as an access route. If your disability means you can no longer use the parking facilities on your property, you can apply for a reserved on street parking space.

Parking Abroad

Parking arrangements for disabled people vary a great deal around the world, but in the EU the rules are starting to be standardised. You can now use a blue badge in most EU countries. Your travel agent should be able to help you clarify the rules for particular destinations.

Blue badges are also accepted in some countries outside the EU. Some American states now recognise them, but as a rule it is best to apply for a temporary visitor's disabled access permit in each state you intend to visit.

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[Add a Comment]
We live in a block of flats that has parking spaces, some allocated and some on a first come first served basis,,,because parking is limited the management are introducing parking permits to stop other people using our spaces,are they legally required to provide blue badge parkingspaces.
Gill - 19-Sep-17 @ 10:24 PM
Trebor - Your Question:
My wife dislocated her ankle and has tendon damage. Currently she has a ankle support and crutches. Lookily we have an automatic car so driving is still possible. However getting in and out the car is a struggle and the door needs to be fully open. Can she use disabled bays whilst she is current state ?

Our Response:
Blue badges are not issued for temporary conditions and are generally only issued for permanent conditions. However the DfT is considering a reform to the blue badge process and the an introduction of a temporary badge. You can see more via the gov.uk link here. At the same time, please see gov.uk link here which advises where you tell the DVLA about a condition that might affect the ability to drive safely, which subsequently could affect your wife's insurance policy, please see link here .
DisabledTravelAdvice - 11-Sep-17 @ 1:02 PM
My wife dislocated her ankle and has tendon damage. Currently she has a ankle support and crutches. Lookily we have an automatic car so driving is still possible. However getting in and out the car is a struggle and the door needs to be fully open. Can she use disabled bays whilst she is current state ?
Trebor - 10-Sep-17 @ 2:14 PM
I just wondered what do you do if you are in a car park in which regular users have to pay, if all the disabled bays are full and I was forced to park in a regular bay would I then have to pay as well even if it states disabled badge uses park free. Would it only be free if I get a disabled parking bay?
Sam - 4-Sep-17 @ 8:55 PM
@Helli - You can only apply for a disabled bay where there is no off-street parking available (e.g. garage, driveway or rear access). You might be able to apply for a H bar. You can do this if you have a properly constructed pavement crossing (e.g. dropped kerbs) outside your house. Also, if you have a driveway or garage where the car is kept clear of the pavement and if access to the driveway is difficult due to regular parking near the pavement crossing. H bar road marking are painted on to tell other road users not to block access to off-road parking areas which sounds just what you need!
RodJ - 4-Sep-17 @ 12:17 PM
Hi my husband and i both claim pip. My husband has the higher rate so he has a blue badge. Where we live the parking isnt brilliant and its on a school street. Peopke keep parking across our drive which is one thing that i never do! Ive spoke to our local traffic guys and they said we could apply and pay for a yellow disabled bay. I park my car on the drive because my last car was badly scratched by the neighbours. But sometimes its impossible to get in and out of our drive.If we had a disabled bay outside our home at the bottom of our drive would we have to actually have to park our car there or can we park on the drive. And use the bay as a warning for people do not park across our drive? Helli
Helli - 3-Sep-17 @ 8:54 AM
@M - the bays are usually only mandatory, which means anyone can use them. Most people are respectful of the fact there is a reason why there is an alloted bay, but some people aren't.
MissR - 29-Aug-17 @ 12:50 PM
I just wanted to ask if you have a disabled parking space outside your house which is used by the home owner and yes they did apply for one , can anyone with a blue disabled badge park there. Many Thanks
M - 27-Aug-17 @ 4:14 PM
I applied for a Disabled bay outside my home. I was refused saying I was getting a cross over to enable our son and husband to get the cars off the road and leave me space to park outside. However, I have read that you can apply for help if parking on your property is not an option because of how residents park in our heavily built up street. Last night I had no option but to park away from the house. On getting up this morning my neighbour, who has a large driveway, a transit van and car, decided to park right up to my vehicle. His wife told my husband to park outside our own home and not theirs or park up our drive. I have no cross over yet and find his manners intimidating as I could not have got my wheelchair out of the car a he was inches from my bumper. He moved his van, but he put it outside my home leaving me no room to move mine. I am scared of him, I admit and feel he is causing me to feel too afraid to talk to him. What can I do, please give me a hand here. I suffer ME and other various problems and only 60
Tenpindee - 9-Aug-17 @ 2:01 PM
I applied for a Disabled bay outside my home. I was refused saying I was getting a cross over to enable our son and husband to get the cars off the road and leave me space to park outside. However, I have read that you can apply for help if parking on your property is not an option because of how residents park in our heavily built up street. Last night I had no option but to park away from the house. On getting up this morning my neighbour, who has a large driveway, a transit van and car, decided to park right up to my vehicle. His wife told my husband to park outside our own home and not theirs or park up our drive. I have no cross over yet and find his manners intimidating as I could not have got my wheelchair out of the car a he was inches from my bumper. He moved his van, but he put it outside my home leaving me no room to move mine. I am scared of him, I admit and feel he is causing me to feel too afraid to talk to him. What can I do, please give me a hand here. I suffer ME and other various problems and only 60
Tenpindee - 9-Aug-17 @ 10:57 AM
He's not the talking type; the other night he deliberately moved up half a car length so I could not get in and he told me to "try and get in there d***head!"
Bradleybunch - 7-Aug-17 @ 4:52 PM
Bradleybunch - Your Question:
Hi, I've got a neighbour who is a BB holder. He has a disabled space outside his property which I have never used, and would never want to use. He drives a minibus type disability vehicle with a sticker on the back asking for 3 meters worth of space. Again, I have always complied with this.Unfortunately, the gentlemen does not use the space, and instead parks so the rear of the vehicle (requiring 3 meters of clearance) is facing away from the disability space so he always has two vehicles worth of space. Am I legally required to leave the 3 metres of space? Or can I park up to him and trust he gets the message and turns the vehicle round so the 3 meters worth of access is achieved from the disability space he never used?

Our Response:
In this case, I think having a subtle word is the best option so that you can discuss the arrangement between you.
DisabledTravelAdvice - 7-Aug-17 @ 3:44 PM
Hi, I've got a neighbour who is a BB holder. He has a disabled space outside his property which I have never used, and would never want to use. He drives a minibus type disability vehicle with a sticker on the back asking for 3 meters worth of space. Again, I have always complied with this. Unfortunately, the gentlemen does not use the space, and instead parks so the rear of the vehicle (requiring 3 meters of clearance) is facing away from the disability space so he always has two vehicles worth of space. Am I legally required to leave the 3 metres of space? Or can I park up to him and trust he gets the message and turns the vehicle round so the 3 meters worth of access is achieved from the disability space he never used?
Bradleybunch - 6-Aug-17 @ 9:46 PM
Tash - Your Question:
I live in Wales so I don't know if the the law is different to the rest of the UK but a neighbour, who is BB holder asked for my help in applying for a disabled parking bay outside their house. The Council have told me they don't provide on street disabled parking bays. Is it their choice to offer these bays or not or is it a legal requirement for them to do so?

Our Response:
You can check whether your neighbour's area is eligible via the gov.uk link here . Individual councils have different policies and also it can also depends upon the presence or absence of general parking restrictions outside the property i.e the council cannot place a disabled bay on a main road, or one with yellow line parking restrictions.
DisabledTravelAdvice - 3-Aug-17 @ 10:01 AM
@Anna You honestly have no idea how horrible she is and she is definitely the type to do it more if you politely asked her not to .Another thing is that one of the cars is a huge seven seater and then she has a mini however her seven seater is parked in the most ridiculous way possible. The back of the car is taking up the whole pavement outside of her house ! This is definitely a nuisance as most of the time the seven seater is taking up the pavement so no one can walk on it but even worse she parks her car on the road right behind the seven seater therefore a stick wouldn't even be able to squeeze through never mind a wheelchair or a pushchair. What could I do should I take this matter to the council or how should I approach it ? Once again a civilised conversation with her is adding fuel to the fire !
Laila - 2-Aug-17 @ 11:16 PM
I live in Wales so I don't know if the the law is different to the rest of the UK but a neighbour, who is BB holder asked for my help in applying for a disabled parking bay outside their house. The Council have told me they don't provide on street disabled parking bays. Is it their choice to offer these bays or not or is it a legal requirement for them to do so?
Tash - 1-Aug-17 @ 4:38 PM
@Laila - your neighbour sounds awful! the thing is, there isn't much you can do as a disabled base outside a house is advisory and not mandatory. She sounds like the type who would do it more if you asked her not to. You could seek advice about reporting her as a nuisance to the council.
Anna - 1-Aug-17 @ 12:42 PM
Hi I have a disabled parking outside of my house and my neighbour has a driveway with two cars. She however seems to not use her drive most of the time and parks her car Infront of our house. Once someone parked outside of her house she called and got a £60 fine on the car. This is really unfair what can I do to get her not to park on our parking space. Having a civil conversation is out of the question as she's horrible any suggestions?
Laila - 31-Jul-17 @ 6:08 PM
I had a bay install on our street I have severe spine problem I struggle to walk I have other medical issues like getting to a loo in time am 61 I cannot get to park my car in the bay someone on my street has a blue badge and is constantly parked in the bay Ihave to struggle to walk with a bag from outside the cul de sac when the cab drop me off I had a terrible fall it's not fair at all what can I do
Doris - 24-Jul-17 @ 6:11 PM
@Dan - you would have to appeal. That seems pretty unfair to me.
Maggie - 24-Jul-17 @ 1:57 PM
Hello, I am a disabled resident living in a clsoe, we used to be able to park anywhere within this close but that has recently changed and it is now bay parking only, I have a disabled badge, we have 3 disabled bays downstairs but 4 disabled residents. They are stating we have to have a permit along side the disabled badge to park in the disabled bays, this is something I have never heard of before but regardless I contacted the company to get a permit and was refused! Their reasons for not issuing me with a permit was because there is only 3 bays and they have already issued 3 permits they have not given me any alternative way of parking and have told me I now have to park outside of the close and walk which I am unable to do, the walk itself is at least over a mile. I need to know if there is anything I can do another this as parking within the close outside of a bay Igetting fined and this is all making my health worse.
Dan - 22-Jul-17 @ 11:56 AM
If someone deliberately parks in your disabled signed space constantly, it is a course of conduct which is Anti-Social Behaviour. There is recourse in Civil Court Proceedings for Harassment causing the disabled person alarm and distress. These actions are covered by "Protection From Harassment Act 1997" and "Disability Discrimination Act 1995". If you are a driver of a Motability vehicle the insurance requires that the vehicle is parked outside the disabled persons home when the driver lives at that address. This is a compelling reason for the Local Council's Anti-Social actions officer to support you.
Man with an answer - 19-Jul-17 @ 8:55 PM
Rumi - Your Question:
Our next door neighbour as a disabled bay outside her house for her son. which she mis uses for her own buisness purpose. not only that she has put 2 cones on each side of d white parkings taking up 2 extra car spaces. im.sure ahe is not allowed. we can clearly see d disabled sign so why is she been allowed to do this.

Our Response:
Attempting to keep hold of a parking spot can mean a fine of up to £100, if the council is made aware of this. It is an offence under the Highways Act for anyone other than the police or the council to put cones out in the road. Your neighbour would not have permission to do this.
DisabledTravelAdvice - 18-Jul-17 @ 2:52 PM
our next door neighbour as a disabled bay outside her house for her son . which she mis uses for her own buisness purpose .not only that she has put 2 cones on each side of d white parkings taking up 2 extra car spaces .im.sure ahe is not allowed . we can clearly see d disabled sign so why is she been allowed to do this .
Rumi - 18-Jul-17 @ 1:53 PM
My mum (70) and dad (73) are both elderly and my mum uses a wheelchair to move around due to loss of feeling in her feet as a result of being diabetic and having high blood pressure added to being overweight. They are visiting us from a non EU country for 8 weeks. Is there a possibility of getting a temporary disabled badge for them for this period to be easy to find a parking space when we go out. If yes, where should I apply for it and how long does it take. Thank you.
RH - 9-Jul-17 @ 8:22 PM
Private- Your Question:
I have a disabled parking outside my home and no body let's me career park the car therefore I need to park on the next road I wishould I can fine them somehow

Our Response:
As advised on the comment below to Jazz, a blue badge disabled parking space outside a disabled person's house is only advisory, not mandatory. Therefore, those who ignore the advisory markings cannot be fined.
DisabledTravelAdvice - 30-Jun-17 @ 12:01 PM
I have a disabled parking outside my home and no body let's me career park the car therefore I need to park on the next road I wishould I can fine them somehow
Private - 29-Jun-17 @ 5:45 PM
Jazz - Your Question:
Hi I have a blue badge disabled parking space outside my house for my use. What do I do if people abuse the parking. Who would I call? I live in Greenford.Many thanks in advance.

Our Response:
I'm afraid a blue badge disabled parking space outside a disabled person's house is only advisory, not mandatory. Whilst most people keep to the restrictions there may be others who will not. I can only advise that you explain to the people who are using your space the reasons why you need the space. However, you cannot enforce the disabled restrictions, you can only hope that your neighbours will comply.
DisabledTravelAdvice - 29-Jun-17 @ 3:32 PM
Hi I have a blue badge disabled parking space outside my house for my use. What do I do if people abuse the parking. Who would I call? I live in Greenford. Many thanks in advance.
Jazz - 28-Jun-17 @ 2:54 PM
@PMor - seriously, she needs to complain or appeal this :( This is ridiculous if the houses are specifically for the elderly. She'll definitely have a case!
Joanne - 19-Jun-17 @ 4:21 PM
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